Scar Management

After the injury, many parents do everything they can to try to reduce their child’s scarring. You might worry that there are new treatments available for scarring that you have not heard about.

“There’s a lot of research that we do to see how we can, before she hits her teens, at least help alleviate some of it. It’s that constant quest for knowledge and treatment. You’re on such a micro-level each day or every week managing the burns so for you it becomes an obsession.”

There are a number of different treatment options available for scarring, although it is important to remember that every scar is different and they change over time. Below is a list of treatments that may be used to treat your child’s scars. Your child may not need any of these treatments, they may be offered several, or all of them. Your child’s Consultant will discuss with you the best treatment for their scars.

Hover over each bullet point to find out a little bit more about each one.

  • moisturising the area
  • massage
  • silicone gel/sheeting
  • pressure garments
  • laser therapy
  • steroids
  • skin needling
  • splints
  • exercises

If you have any questions about the treatments that may be available for your child, speak to the burns service where your child was treated, or to your child’s GP.

Many parents want to know what their child’s scar will look like in the future. It can be frustrating when no one can give you a definite answer about this or show you a photograph.

“We started searching for photos online but they are all so different. The professionals don’t like to say what it will look like. Unless it’s very minor, they’ll happily say that would be fine, but if it’s anything beyond that they like to be a little bit more sort of open don’t they, because they just don’t know. But, as a parent, that’s hard.”

Burns are assessed by how seriously the skin is damaged and which layers of skin are affected. The depth of a burn is important for planning treatment and predicting healing. Deeper burns are more likely to need surgical treatments. You should ask the team treating your child if you have any questions.

 

 

Burns are assessed by how seriously the skin is damaged and which layers of skin are affected. The depth of a burn is important for planning treatment and predicting healing. Deeper burns are more likely to need surgical treatments. You should ask the team treating your child if you have any questions.

You can read more about burns and scalds here:
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Burns-and-scalds/

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